10 SIGNS YOU SHOULD GO SEE THE DOCTOR

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Do I need to see a doctor? Contrary to what you may believe, seeing the doctor isn’t always necessary for serious conditions or accidents. A cough was the most frequent cause of illness-related medical visits in 2012, per the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Remember that early identification can result in improved results for many ailments, no matter what your circumstance. Continue reading to learn 10 warning indications that it’s time to contact the doctor, including when your cough is severe enough to require one.

Remember that this is by no means an entire list, and if anything doesn’t seem right, trust your instincts and get medical help.

YOUR FEVER IS CONSISTENTLY HIGH.
Your body naturally fights illness in part by producing a fever. Call your doctor if your fever is higher than 103 Fahrenheit (39.4 Celsius) or if it lasts more than three days. There may be a more severe infection at work.

YOU BECOME UNUSUALLY SICK WITH COLD
It might be challenging to decide whether to seek medical attention for a cold; if yours persists or even becomes worse, do so. Pay attention to the following in particular:
While persistent congestion can cause a sinus infection if left untreated, whooping cough may be the cause if it lasts more than two weeks.
You could have the flu if you have a fever, muscular pains, or other flu-like symptoms. It’s preferable to visit the doctor in these circumstances to obtain a Tamiflu prescription. People who are elderly, pregnant, or who have heart illnesses should take particular precautions since they are more prone to experience complications from the flu.
Shortness of breath, chest discomfort, and extremely trouble swallowing.

YOU QUICKLY AND UNDERSTANDABLY LOST WEIGHT
Unexpected weight loss might be a sign of several conditions, including liver disease, diabetes, depression, and an overactive thyroid. Make an appointment with your doctor if you’ve dropped more than 10% of your body weight in the last six months and you aren’t obese.

YOU’RE BREATHING RARELY.
All of these common causes of shortness of breath — high altitude, vigorous activity, obesity, and excessive heat — contribute to it. Ask your doctor about the potential of asthma, bronchitis, or another ailment if none of these are the source of your shortness of breath, especially if the symptoms appear suddenly and strongly.

YOUR CHEST, ABDOMINAL, OR PELVIC PAIN IS EXTREME.
An underlying condition that needs medical treatment might be indicated by abnormal, severe, and persistent pain in the chest, abdomen, or pelvic. Examples include appendicitis or kidney infection when the pain is in the pelvis, gallstones when the pain is in the belly (particularly if it is accompanied by nausea and vomiting), and heart attack when the pain is in the chest.

YOUR URINATION OR BOWEL MOVEMENT HAS CHANGED

The most crucial sign to watch out for is a sudden shift in your routine, whether that’s bloody or black stools, diarrhea or constipation, or excessive urine. Bear in mind that bowel movement and urination differ from person to person. It’s wise to speak with your doctor when these occur.

YOUR VISION IS INTERRUPTED BY BRIGHT FLASHES
You could occasionally see bright flashes or patches in your eyesight if you get migraines. A retinal detachment is a dangerous disorder that requires prompt medical care to prevent irreversible vision loss. In situations other than these, unexpected bright flashes may be an indication of this problem.

YOU FEEL CONFUSED OR YOUR MOOD CHANGES
Both medical diseases like an infection or medication interaction and mental health problems, such as anxiety or depression, can cause mood swings and unexpected bewilderment. Be on the lookout for issues with concentration or thinking, inconsistent sleeping habits, and depressive or anxious moods.

YOU THINK YOU MIGHT BE CONCUSSED
If you’ve hit your head or landed on it, keep an eye out for concussion symptoms. Consult your doctor if any of these symptoms worsen, which might include trouble focusing, headaches, irritability, and changes in sleep patterns.

AFTER A PROCEDURE OR STARTING A NEW MEDICATION, YOU DEVELOP UNPREDICTABLE SYMPTOMS.
Ask your doctor in advance about the recognized symptoms before any medical operation, surgery, vaccine, or beginning of new medicine. Keep an eye out for them, and if anything unusual happens, call the doctor’s office to see whether an appointment is recommended.

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